NYC's tallest and most sustainable building could be a 2,400-foot tree-covered tower

NYC's tallest and most sustainable building could be a 2,400-foot tree-covered tower
A total of 10,000 plants cover the area. Courtesy of 6sqft

The imposing skyline of Manhattan looms over Roosevelt Island, but that could all be changing. The architect firm Rescubika Creations has proposed a tower on the island that would dwarf the World Trade Center and become the tallest structure in the country.

It is proposed that the residential skyscraper will lie between the Queensboro Bridge and the south point of Manhattan Island. Upon completion, the 160-story building will be the tallest structure in the world at 2,418 feet. That’s twice as high as the Crysler Building and three times as high as One World Trade Center, which is currently America’s tallest building at 1,776 feet high. (That's right, Manhattan.) Additionally, it would easily claim the title of second-tallest building in the world, behind only the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

Amazingly, height isn't the tower's most impressive aspect. With a name to honor the mandrake plant, Mandragore is as green as they come, both literally and figuratively. In its capacity as a "carbon sink," it would be able to trap a great deal of carbon emissions to combat the greenhouse effect and aid in reaching carbon neutrality by 2050.

Courtesy of NYC Urbanism
Courtesy of NYC Urbanism

With 83,000 square feet of plant walls, the futuristic design includes 8,300 shrubs, 1,600 trees, and wooden construction materials. Not only does this living and organic matter make a very striking visual statement, it also absorbs carbon dioxide. Solar panels and wind turbines make up nearly 23,000 square feet of the structure's clean energy production.

Mandragore would be equipped with underground pipes that would capture and circulate warm and cool air to deal with the extreme weather conditions of the city. Additionally, each apartment will provide a home office, which will eliminate the need for commuting and reduce emissions further. Considering how many people are working from home due to the pandemic, this is a suggestion that is likely to take root.

Mandragore, though still just a concept, would certainly help New York City achieve its goals under the Climate Mobilization Act, including a 30% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. Also, it will bring Roosevelt Island to the forefront.